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King Arthur – Provincial Dux, Comes or Tribunus? – Part Six

20 Nov

To do the subject justice, I’m afraid this has become a seven part blog!

PART SEVEN WAS ACCIDENTALLY PUBLISHED TOO EARLY. IT’S TWO POSTS BACK, OR CLICK HERE TO SEE IT.

Provinces based on Anne Dornier's theory with my own thoughts (kindly created for me by Steffon Worthington)

The (wonderful!) map above isn’t quite correct in its placement of some of the northern tribes and will be updated soon, but I wanted to get this blog out this weekend.

THE EAST: MAXIMA CAESARIENSIS & FLAVIA CAESARIENSIS  

If Ken Dark (and others) are right, and the eastern provinces were still trying to function, even with ‘Anglo-Saxon’ presence, then Arthur could have been used in the fight back against them within these provinces. There could have been British elite elements within them that came together to fight the cultural and military expansion of the Germanic (and Scandinavian?) elements. This may seem more unlikely, especially in light of what Gildas says about the division between these two cultures in his day after the victory of Badon and subsequent battles, but it’s still a possibility. Below is a map created for the blog All Quite On The Eastern Front? that shows the possible british enclaves. (Ken Dark think these eastern British areas may have been even larger).

A rough placing of the 'Anglo-Saxon' regions (map based on Howard Wiseman))

THE BATTLES … YET AGAIN.

Many have struggled to place the battles within these two eastern provinces, but without much success. This is not surprising for the opposite reason to the Cornish and Welsh or even Scottish battle sites: the domination of English place names.

A none-royal military dux could be exactly what we would find in what was the Civil Zone. If Arthur was, indeed, the defeater of the southern ‘Saxons’, then, perhaps, this is where the battles should be. This is where Collingwood tried to place them in the 1930s … in the southeast. Fighting mainly within these provinces certainly shouldn’t be ruled out, but it is slightly harder to understand why all those western seaboard kings gave their sons the name in the late 6th century – unless he was brought in from outside to the eastern provinces, or married in from outside – or as to why Gildas talks of a division between Britons and ‘Saxons’ after Badon.

CITIES

Whilst most cities had gone into disuse by Gildas’s time, archaeology has shown us that there are a number that didn’t: Wroxeter, York, Chester, Silchester, London,  Cirencester and others. What these cities were like at the end of the 5th century, or what they were used for, is hotly debated.  No matter what their use was – administrative, market  centre, ecclesiastical – any city would need its own militia to protect it, and either their hinterland supplied extra men when needed or they themselves may have needed to supply some men to a provincial force. The cities could have brought in mercenaries or feoderati. Two of these cities had Irish (or Goidelic speaking Britons) buried in them: Roman Wroxeter (Viriconium Cornoviorum) in modern day Shropshire, and Silchester (Calleva Atrebatum) in Wiltshire:

  • Wroxeter: CVNORIX | MACVSM/A | QVICO[L]I[N]E, ‘Cunorix son of Maqui Coline’ (c.460-475, Wright/Jackson/1968)
  • Silchester – EBICATO[S]/[MAQ]I MUCO[I--], ‘of Ebicatus, son of the tribe of … ‘ (c. 500-700, Fulford/Clarke/1999 or 350-425, Fulford et al 2000).

Wroxeter was in Britannia Prima, but Silchester was in Maxima Caesariensis … if we’ve got the borders right! What these gentlemen were, we may never know, but they could have been warriors.

What these cities called their military leaders is unknown. Perhaps St Germanus’ meeting a man of tribuni status at St Albans (Verulamium), might point to it being this, but this event was some sixty years previous.

DUX BRITANNIAE (DUKE OF THE BRITAINS) OR MAGISTER MILITUM (COMMANDER IN CHIEF)?

The one point on which most of these scholars who forward the possible survival of the provinces agree on, and I’d have to agree with them too, is the unlikelyhood of a dux in charge of warriors of all the remaining British run provinces in Britannia, or, to add to this, that a comes would be allowed to function cross provincial borders … but, never say never. This being the case it makes it hard to know why a dux of Britannia Prima, for example, would be fighting north of the Wall … if this is where some of the Arthurian battles were? Conversely, what would a northern dux of Valentia, for example, be doing fighting at Badon, IF it was in the southwest, in Britannia Prima, or even at the proposed Lincolnshire site (Thomas Green, 2008)?

Of course, the simple answer could be the battles weren’t in the north, or those in the north were either later additions or the battles of some other Arthur. All possible. There are other possibilities: provinces assisted one another at times; Arthur fulfilled the position as dux (or comes or tribunus) for two or more provinces, at different times in his career; he fought battles as a warband ‘battle leader’ in the Old North (between the Walls)  and became a dux (or comes or tribunus) for a southern province; he was actually only a dux of a single kingdom/civitas and this still could see him in charge of ‘kings’ in the form of petty kings. Poetry or oral ‘history’ about him would probably not remember or mention such details, or mix details of deferent parts of his life into one narrative. However, as discussed earlier, at the time of Badon, was it only the more Romanised regions (and possibly the north) that would have military only (none-royal) duces? Perhaps not, and the evidence from Gildas isn’t conclusive.

What about a Magister Militum? This was the highest military rank you could achieve and a very famous 5th century one, Aegidius, is said to have been made a king by the Franks (reges Romanorum/Romanorum rex/princeps Romanorum in various sources), although some scholar have doubted this. David Dumville has wonder if this person could have either inspired or was used as a model by the British in the more Romanised regions (2003). Is this what Ambrosius Aurelianus was? As mentioned earlier, it is this position that Gidlow wonders being given to the ‘Saxon’, ‘Hengist’ (or whatever his name might have been), which is why they were able to take two provinces during the rebellion.

If there was a Magister Militum in late 5th century Britain, it’s impossible to discern him from the only source we have.

WHY COULDN’T THEY STOP THE ‘ANGLO-SAXONS’?

To digress slightly, the one questions that is always foremost in my mind with the ‘continuity’ argument (as opposed to those who say Britain fragmented not long after Roman withdrawal)  and that is why, if we had enough soldiers in Britannia and it was still a united diocese, we couldn’t stop the ‘Anglo-Saxon’ rebellion and domination of culture? If the ‘Anglo-Saxons’ seized the two more Romanised province then why didn’t the huge provinces of the north and west band together to expel them?

Complex question, I know, which probably has an even more complex answer. Those who argue fragmentation would simply point out these areas weren’t united enough to defeat them, but there are other alternatives:

1. The northern and western provinces were united but didn’t care what was happening in the east; perhaps even thinking these provinces deserved it. It didn’t seem a problem until they became a threat to them.

2. They saw a benefit in these provinces being weakened and took advantage of it.

3. The whole of the diocese was actually under ‘Anglo-Saxon’ control (or rule) for a while at least, via a Germanic vicarus and Magister Militum as per Christopher Gidlow’s, and Nick Higham goes along the lines.

There’s no reason why it couldn’t be the latter if there had been a coup d’état. It would just be one more usurpation with a ‘Saxon’ in charge instead of, say, a Spaniard (Magnus Maximus). (For this to work, however, it would have to be early on, I would have thought, when there was a diocese). But they then brought more ‘friends’ over the North Sea to help and, in time, they militarily outnumbered the British even though they were still outnumbered perhaps 10:1 or even 20:1 in the population as a whole.

In the last part (promise) I will look at civil roles and if any conclussins can be drawn from all my ramblings.

Thanks again for reading, and I look forward to you comments, thoughts … and corrections.

Mak

PS: HUGE thanks to the map maker Steffon Worthington for creating the Anne Dornier based map free of charge! There are lovely people at the Facebook King Arthur Group page!

PART SEVEN WAS ACCIDENTALLY PUBLISHED TOO EARLY. IT’S TWO POSTS BACK, OR CLICK HERE TO SEE IT.

 

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8 responses to “King Arthur – Provincial Dux, Comes or Tribunus? – Part Six

  1. davidcalvert108

    November 21, 2011 at 7:26 pm

    Just read your latest blog. Fascinating stuff, albeit it somewhat speculative. The only gripe I have is that I’m now going to have to start at the beginning in order to make some sense out of it. lol. Intriguing stuff nevertheless.

     
    • badonicus

      November 21, 2011 at 8:46 pm

      There’s an awful lot of speculation goes on with this period I’m afraid! The problem is two fold: the lack of evidence, or evidence that can be interpreted in several ways (for the period), and the evidence (or lack of) for the existence of Arthur. My blogs try to look at everything around him, so to speak, to see if the period could have given rise to such a figure, and yet not left any contemporary writing about him. (This is why some look for him in other known historical figures, such as Riothamus and Ambrosius Aurelianus). But we also have to filter out what is purely from later legend. (Which is what most people only know). We know there were royal figures named Arthur in the Late 6th/Early 7th centuries. Some argue one of these is the based for the legend, some that they were named after an ‘original’. This is why I wrote the (lengthy) blog, ‘In Search Of The ‘Origina’l King Arthur’.

      These blogs do require a little knowledge of the subject or subjects … or a reading from the beginning of my blogs, if you’re bored (or mad) enough. (I seem to have written the word count of a book!).

      Thanks for taking time out of your own research and writing to read Dave,

      Mak

       
      • davidcalvert108

        November 21, 2011 at 9:07 pm

        No need for thanks. I enjoyed reading it. Truth is I needed a break from my research and writing. Of course I could have chosen a more lightweight subject to start off with. I guess I’m just a glutton for punishment, and certainly not on an intellectual par such as yourself and your readers.

         
  2. badonicus

    November 21, 2011 at 10:32 pm

    Me, intellectual!? Don’t tell anyone, but I just rely on what intellectuals have written. I don’t so much stand on the shoulder’s of giants, more like teater!

     
  3. Howard Wiseman

    November 24, 2011 at 1:16 pm

    Nice looking map, Mak, the new one done for you I mean. But can you correct the attribution for the old one (Wiseman, not Williams).

     
    • badonicus

      November 26, 2011 at 9:32 am

      Your very interesting article on those ‘Britons’ in Burgundy in the early 6th century could have some bearing on all this Howard.

       
  4. badonicus

    November 24, 2011 at 1:42 pm

    Done.

     

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